NOW EAR THIS!

I’ve enlarged my earlobes since my teens, but am now sick of how ugly and unprofessional they look. Despite removing the enlargers, my earlobes are still very stretched out. According to information I’ve read online, the only route to normal looking ears is through plastic surgery. What can you tell me about this procedure and will I experience a lot of pain and downtime? Nigel, Sabah

Cosmetic Surgery & Beauty Magazine - November 14, 11:00 AM

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, Dr. Yap Lok Huei.

If patients have had their earlobes enlarged and would like for them to look relatively normal again, it would definitely require surgery. First and foremostly, surgeons will have to remove the internal ring of skin and later reshape the stretched skin. This is a fairly straightforward procedure, but whether or not the surgery is successful depends on how much stretched skin is present. In certain situations, dermal stretching can be quite excessive, and if this is in fact the case, it will limit the amount of available tissue needed for stitching. Essentially, the operation involves securing the distended part of the skin back to the base of the ear. Should patients desire this surgery, it will require careful and individual assessment. Nevertheless, it is an outpatient procedure and doesn’t require much downtime.

Find a Doctor

Product and Machine Supplier
Boston Sante, Inc.
Verified
Product and Machine Supplier
Skincode Switzerland
Verified
Other
Daphne
Verified
Dermatologists
Dr Lim Shueh Wei
Verified
Here at Cosmetic Surgery and Beauty Magazine, we advocate being your best self. If patients plan or desire to undergo procedures, why allow negative comments or silly taboos to affect your choice? Do whatever it takes to be happy. It’s your life. Your future. Your bliss. When you’re at your peak physical self, confidence and happiness is achieved and when contentment is accomplished, inner beauty shines through.
Cosmetic Surgery & Beauty Magazine (CS&B) flies the standard in support of people who have gone under the knife but are afraid to admit it.
Cosmetic Surgery & Beauty (CS&B) researches syndactyly and speaks to the experts who treat webbed fingers.